ExpedMed

Nursing CEU's Now Offered at Expedition Medicine National Conference!

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ExpedMed is excited to announce that the Expedition Medicine National Conference is now accredited for 16 hours of nursing CEUs! 

Nurses work all over the world in some of the most extreme environments imaginable.  The Expedition Medicine National Conference trains nurses to take their skills into the world's most remote and unique regions, linking them to the best teaching and an impeccable network of colleagues and mentors.

Be sure to let your nurse friends and colleagues know about the Expedition Medicine National Conference, and if you're an adventurous nurse, we'd love to see you in Little Rock this March 9-10, 2018!

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) to Co-Sponsor the Expedition Medicine National Conference

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We are pleased to announce that the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Office of Global Health will be participating as a co-sponsor in the Expedition Medicine National Conference in Little Rock, Arkansas this March 9th & 10th!

As the only academic health center in the state of Arkansas, UAMS is at the forefront of research and medical education throughout the region and across the United States.  With the UAMS Office of Global Health, the medical center extends its reach globally.  Lead by Dr. Nickolas Zaller, the mission of the Office of Global Health is to, "facilitate capacity building, equitable access and education to promote sustainable healthcare through local and global partnerships."

We at ExpedMed are thrilled to have the participation of the state's storied academic medical center in our event, and are even more excited about the opportunity to partner with UAMS in the training of clinicians for medical work in underserved regions around the world!

 

 

Harvard Humanitarian Initiative Faculty coming to Expedition Medicine National Conference in Little Rock!

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We're pleased to announce that Dr. Tim Erickson, clinical toxicologist and faculty member of the famed Harvard Humanitarian Initiative will be coming to Little Rock to teach at the Expedition Medicine National Conference!

Dr. Erickson has worked all over the world in a variety of clinical and disaster settings.  He currently serves as the Chief of Medical Toxicology at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and his renowned as a researcher and teacher has won him numerous national awards.

At ExpedMed, we're committed to providing the best instructors and the most practical lectures on Expedition Medicine. Dr. Erickson will be teaching on arthropod envenomations, expedition toxicology, and marine envenomations this March.  Be sure to register early for the Expedition Medicine National Conference as space is limited and registrations are already filling up!

Here is Dr. Erickson's full bio:

Dr. Timothy B. Erickson is a new HHI Core Faculty member with expertise in environmental toxicology and crisis in climate change. He also has active humanitarian health projects in conflict regions of Ukraine and Syria.

Dr. Erickson is an emergency medicine physician at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston where he serves as the Chief of Medical Toxicology in the Department of Emergency Medicine.

Dr. Erickson earned his M.D. degree from The Chicago Medical School in 1986. He completed emergency medicine residency training at the University of Illinois and his medical toxicology fellowship at Cook County Hospital in Chicago. Dr. Erickson is a Fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians, American College of Medical Toxicology, American Academy of Clinical Toxicology, and the prestigious National Geographic Explorers Club.

Previously, Dr. Erickson served as the Director for the UIC Center for Global Health and Professor of Emergency Medicine and Medical Toxicology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Erickson also served as the Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs, Graduate Medical Education, and Continuing Medical Education at the UIC College of Medicine. He was an Acting and Interim Head in the Department of Emergency Medicine and has held other multifaceted appointments ranging from EM Residency Program Director to Chief of Medical Toxicology.

Dr. Erickson has been a member of multiple editorial boards and has a prolific academic history including publishing over 120 original journal articles and book chapters as well as editing 4 major textbooks. He has presented over 100 national and international invited lectures related to emergency medicine, toxicology, humanitarian global health, and wilderness/expedition medicine.

Dr. Erickson’s federal grant funding includes HRSA sponsored grants related to global preparedness and bioterrorism and a Medtronic foundation grant addressing acute cardiovascular disease in India. He has extensive international experience in Africa (Rwanda, Sudan, Kenya), Asia (India, Vietnam, Nepal), South America (Brazil, Peru, Argentina), Europe (Kosovo, Ukraine, France) and Antarctica. 

500lb Alligator Found in Dumas, Arkansas

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This month an 11 foot long, 500 lb alligator was found just outside of Dumas, Arkansas.( http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2017/sep/19/alligator-killed-arkansas-creek-weighed-over-500-p/ )

At the Expedition Medicine National Conference we have an entire lecture entitled, "Large Carnivorous Reptiles" where we discuss how to avoid injury when dealing with large reptiles like alligators (and crocodiles, anacondas, Komodo dragons, and the like), and also how to treat the wounds if an attack occurs.

Come to the most fascinating and practical CME course on practicing medicine "in the wild." Register today while seats are still available!

Schedule for the Expedition Medicine National Conference Now Available!

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Malaria, Refugee Health, High Altitude medicne, Ebola, snake envenomations...whew!

How do you prepare to work as a medical professional in a remote setting when the possibilities for injury or illness are so diverse?

At the Expedition Medicine National Conference we've designed the curriculum to offer a wide range of interesting topics for those who want to learn more about practicing in extreme and remote environments.

Check out our recently published curriculum taught by international experts.  CME doesn't get any better than this!

Friday, March 9th

8am-9am   The Expedition Physician   (Donner)

9am-10am   Travel Immunizations (Townes)

10am-10:30am   Break

10:30am-11:30am   Large Carnivorous Reptiles   (Bledsoe)

11:30am-12:30pm   Expedition & Wilderness Toxicology   (Erickson)

12:30pm-2pm   Lunch (On Your Own)

2pm-3pm   Reptile Envenomations   (Callahan)

3pm-4pm   Mountain Medicine   (Smith)

4pm-4:30pm    Break

4:30pm-5:30pm   High Altitude Medicine    (Donner)

5:30pm-6:30pm   Everest Disaster    (Kamler)

 

Saturday, March 10th

8am-9am   Bringing Combat Medicine to EMS    (Smith)

9am-10am   Malaria    (Townes)

10am-10:30am    Break

10:30am-11:30am    Arthropod Envenomations    (Erickson)

11:30am-12:30pm   Emergency at 30,000ft    (Donner)

12:30pm-2pm     Lunch (On Your Own)

2pm-3pm   Marine Envenomations    (Erickson)

3pm-4pm   Ebola and Mass Casualty Infections    (Callahan)

4pm-4:30pm   Break

4:30pm-5:30pm   Refugee Health    (Townes)

5:30pm-6:30pm   Lightning Strike Mass Casualty Incident    (Smith)

 

*Schedule is tentative and subject to change

Global Health Expert from Seattle coming to ExpedMed Little Rock!

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At ExpedMed, we pride ourselves in creating the best CME events for adventurous medical professionals.

Excellent CME begins with excellent instructors and so it's with great enthusiasm that we introduce another of our stellar faculty members, Dr. David Townes.

Dr. Townes is an Emergency Medicine physician and member of the Global Health faculty at the University of Washington in Seattle.  He is an expert in tropical medicine and working in extreme environments, and he served as a co-editor of our textbook, Expedition and Wilderness Medicine.

We're incredibly honored that Dr. Townes will be visiting Little Rock in March to speak at the Expedition Medicine National Conference.  Reserve your seat today for this exciting event!

Here is Dr. Townes' full bio:

David Townes, MD, MPH, DTM&H, received his medical degree from the University of Massachusetts and completed his internship and residency in emergency medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago where he also completed a fellowship in International Emergency Medicine earning a Master's Degree in Public Health (MPH) with a concentration in Health Policy and Administration. He is board certified in emergency medicine. He also holds a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (DTM&H) from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Dr. Townes joined the faculty at the University of Washington in 2001 in the Division of Emergency Medicine. In addition, he is currently a Public Health and Medical Technical Advisor to the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) at the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and Medical Epidemiologist in the Emergency Response and Recovery Branch (ERRB) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In this capacity his interests and responsibilities include providing expert technical advice, formulating and conveying OFDA public health policy and technical positions, reviewing all health proposals submitted to OFDA, and design, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation of some OFDA funded programs.

Previously, Dr. Townes was appointed as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Officer and Medical Epidemiologist in the Malaria Branch at the CDC and served as a Lieutenant Commander in the United States Public Health Service (USPHS).

In addition to his global health experience, Dr. Townes has worked extensively in the areas of wilderness and expedition medicine, including serving as an expedition physician in Antarctica, Costa Rica, and on Mt. Kilimanjaro. He has been a physician member of the National Ski Patrol and the Yosemite National Park Search and Rescue Team. He is an editor of Expedition and Wilderness Medicine published by Cambridge University Press in 2009.

Dr. Townes has worked in Antarctica, Costa Rica, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Russia, Senegal, Tanzania, Turkey, the West Indies, and Zambia.

His research interests include response to complex humanitarian emergencies, disease surveillance in humanitarian emergencies, health policy for humanitarian emergencies, refugee and internally displaced populations, and malaria.

Famed Expedition Physician and Author Coming to ExpedMed Little Rock!

Dr. Howard Donner

Dr. Howard Donner

ExpedMed is excited to announce that Dr. Howard Donner is confirmed for our Little Rock event on March 9-10, 2018!

Dr. Donner is one of the leading voices of Wilderness Medicine and is an experienced expert in remote medical care. 

Here is Dr. Donner's biography:

Howard Donner, MD is a highly acclaimed speaker on Wilderness Medicine. Renowned as one of the “world’s most experienced expedition physicians”, Dr. Donner is co-author of The Field Guide to Wilderness Medicine, worked on numerous medical projects in the Himalayas, 3 seasons as a rescue doctor on Mt. McKinley in Alaska for the National Park Service at the 14,000 foot medical/rescue station, expedition physician on the first American ascent of Kangchenjunga, the world’s third largest peak (28,000 feet), Olympic physician for the United States White Water Team in Atlanta (1996) and 5 years of service as a medical operations consultant for NASA. Dr. Donner has been prominently featured in two award-winning NOVA television documentaries including; "Deadly Ascent" which chronicles mountain medicine and research on 20,320 ft Denali (Mount McKinley); and "Everest - The Death Zone". Donner served as expedition doctor on the 1998 NOVA Everest expedition, which was featured in the television documentary: "Everest: The Death Zone".

High Altitude Medicine with Dr. Howard Donner at ExpedMed!

At a prior ExpedMed event, Dr. Howard Donner delivered a lecture on high altitude medicine.  We recorded the talk and are making it available to ExpedMed fans as an example of the quality of teaching displayed at ExpedMed.

Howard is an author and highly experienced expedition physician who has traveled the world and lectures to thousands of physicians annually.

Take a look at this lecture, and if you want more, be sure to register for our Expedition Medicine National Conference that will be in Little Rock, Arkansas, March 9-10, 2018!

 

Dr. Ken Kamler speaks at the Arkansas Heart Summit!

Dr. Ken Kamler and Dr. Bruce Murphy

Dr. Ken Kamler and Dr. Bruce Murphy

One of our ExpedMed faculty was in Little Rock this past weekend speaking at the Arkansas Heart Summit!

Dr. Ken Kamler was the keynote speaker at the Summit this year, an event that was attended by 400 clinicians from around the state of Arkansas.  On Friday evening, Dr. Kamler told his gripping story of the 1996 blizzard on Mount Everest that claimed the lives of numerous climbers.  Dr. Kamler was the only physician on the mountain that day, and his photos and anecdotes about the incident were riveting.

At the end of his talk, Dr. Kamler received a standing ovation from the crowd led by Dr. Bruce Murphy, CEO of the Arkansas Heart Hospital.

It was fantastic to have Dr. Kamler here in Arkansas, and it will be great to welcome him back to Little Rock this March 9-10, 2018 for the Expedition Medicine National Conference!

Mrs. Sara Bledsoe, Dr. Greg Bledsoe, and Dr. Ken Kamler at the Arkansas Heart Summit

Mrs. Sara Bledsoe, Dr. Greg Bledsoe, and Dr. Ken Kamler at the Arkansas Heart Summit

Harvard Infectious Disease Expert Dr. Michael V. Callahan coming to Little Rock!

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We're pleased to announce out newest faculty addition to the Expedition Medicine National Conference: Michael V. Callahan MD  DTM&H  MSPH.

Dr. Callahan is a well-known expert in the Infectious Disease Division of Massachusetts General Hospital.  He has lead numerous research projects in his area of expertise, and from 2005-2012 he led DARPA's $270M biodefense therapeutics program.

Dr. Callahan is a frequent national lecturer and excellent teacher.  We're incredibly excited to have Dr. Callahan on our faculty list for the March 9-10, 2018 Expedition Medicine National Confernence in Little Rock.  Be sure to register early as space is limited!

Dr. Callahan's full profile:

"Michael Callahan is a physician scientist boarded in medicine, ID, tropical medicine (DTM&H), Mass Casualty Care (DMC) and Rescue Medicine Command MD#17. Dr. Callahan's clinical appointments are at MGH/Harvard Medical School, and Visiting Professor at King Chulalongkorn Medical Center in Bangkok, Kaduna, Nigeria and Panama City, PN. His focus is emergency clinical trials for catastrophic infectious diseases such as Ebola, H5N1, MERS, Zika Virus, Chikungunya and complex dengue viral disease. He has developed drugs in market and expedited Phase 2 trials to support Animal Rule decisions including EUA-OLU trials for H5N1 (Jakarta), H7N9 (Nanjing), cutaneous anthrax (Gombe) burkholderia (Phnom Penh), Ebola (Isiro, Monrovia) and Lassa (Kaduna, Kano). From 2005-2012 he led DARPA's $270M biodefense therapeutics program where he developed multiple drugs in clinic and launched Prophecy, a international physician-to-foreign government clinical trials network to support regulatory decisions for zoonotic and biodefense therapies. In 2010 he was awarded the DARPA Achievement Award, the highest award in the Agency. Biotechnology achievements include: CRP-liposomal amphotericin (Ambisome; Gilead); cPG (Pfizer) MIMIC (Sanofi), pH1N1 vaccine, Nicotinia-expressed Ebola therapies (Leaf/Mapp); 2 vaccines from FSU BW programs and inception, development and funding of DARPA's Accelerated Pharmaceuticals Programs (AMP; 7 INDs; 3 NDAs), 7-Day Biodefense (4 INDs), the MIMIC platform, Rapid Altitude & Hypoxia Acclimatization (ENO; Phase 2),: Prophecy (7 international trial sites) and CLIO (licensing agreement disclosed under CDA). In 2012 Dr. Callahan was recruited as President of Unither Virology a United Therapeutics company (UTHR), leading a R&D team executing a $45M NIH contract to accelerate a antiviral from lead to Phase 2 for dengue and flu, and to develop next-generation antivirals against RSV, Zika, Chikungunya and transplant-associated viral indications."

What Do People Think About Our ExpedMed Courses? Let's Ask them and Find Out!

One of the things that is most gratifying to us at ExpedMed is the excited feedback we get from those who come to our events.

Our ExpedMed events have been attended by hundreds of clinicians from all over the world, and it's always incredibly fun to hear their feedback and their stories.

At one of our past events we took some quick interviews with participants and asked what they thought of the teaching at ExpedMed. Curious? Click on the video below to see for yourself why people ar so excited about ExpedMed.

Don't forget to register for our Little Rock conference! It's coming in March and space is limited!

 

Tiger Attacks Woman in China Drive-Through Safari

With most urban people having few encounters with truly wild animals these days, a lack of appreciation for the strength and, at times, ferocity of large predators unfortunately develops.  People who take risks around these creatures sometimes learn the dangers too late.  

In this video, a woman steps out of her car in a drive through safari in China and is attacked by a tiger. (Warning: Graphic Content)

At our ExpedMed events, we discuss animal attacks-- how to treat them, but also how to prevent them.  Learn from our experts why wild animals should be respected and how best to protect yourself and your travel companions.

 

 

Dr. Will Smith, Medical Director, Grand Teton National Park & Teton County Search and Rescue, coming to Little Rock!

We are pleased to announce that Dr. Will Smith, Medical Director of Teton National Park and Teton County Search and Rescue in Jackson, Wyoming is coming to Little Rock as a member of our ExpedMed faculty!

Dr. Smith has extensive experience in Wilderness Medicine and Search and Rescue.  He has managed mass casualty incidents at high altitude, and has completed multiple deployments overseas as a Lt. Colonel in the US Army Reserve Medical Corps.

We are honored to have Dr. Smith's involvement in our Expedition Medicine National Conference and look forward to hearing his lectures this March!

Dr. Smith's complete bio:

Dr. Smith practices Emergency Medicine in Jackson Hole, Wyoming and is clinical WWAMI faculty for the University of Washington School of Medicine, as well as the Medical Director for the US National Park Service.  Locally, he serves as the Co-Medical Director for Grand Teton National Park, Teton County Search & Rescue, Bridger Teton National Forest, and Jackson Hole Fire/EMS.  Dr. Smith also serves as a Lt. Colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve Medical Corps, recently completing his 3rd Middle East deployment.  LTC Smith has practiced medicine around the world on 6 continents, from the 'Baghdad ER' to Easter Island.  His combat experience combined with his pre-hospital EMS experience as a Paramedic, and his technical Search and Rescue skills have lead to numerous speaking engagements at Wilderness and EMS conferences/seminars around the world. Dr. Smith has also been appointed to several national committees (American Heart Association), authored numerous book chapters and consensus guidelines on Wilderness and Rescue Medicine, and serves as a Subject Matter Expert for DARPA. He has founded and runs Wilderness and Emergency Medicine Consulting (WEMC), LLC. More information can be found at www.wildernessdoc.com .

 

ExpedMed Faculty Member Discusses Venomous Snake Bites: Dr. Tim Erickson

The faculty we invite to our ExpedMed events are true experts in their field.  In this video, Dr. Tim Erickson discusses venomous snake bites and how to treat them.  Tim is a clinical toxicologist at Harvard and will be coming to Little Rock this March to teach in our Expedition Medicine National Conference.  Be sure to register early for our event. Space is limited!

 

ExpedMed 2012 Expedition Medicine National Conference this Week!

Just a reminder to everyone that this week is the Expedition Medicine National Conference.

Classes begin Friday morning and end Sunday around lunch.

Give us a call if you're interested in attending.  We're going to have a lot of fun.

New ExpedMed Adventure: Little Saint Simons Island

Just wanted to check in with you guys and let you know about a new CME trip we've developed here at ExpedMed for February 28 - March 3, 2013.

The trip is on Little Saint Simons Island, a private island that allows no more than 32 overnight guests, has seven miles of pristine beach, in overrun with birds, gators, dolphins, crabs, fish, deer, and other amazing wildlife, and has won numerous travel awards for its incredible food, history, service, and sustainable eco-friendly policies.

Little Saint Simons Island is an incredible place.  It's been in private hands for over 100 years and was converted from a hunting lodge into an eco-resort.  I toured it recently just to make sure it's what we would need for an event, and it was awesome.  

While on the island, I saw a bald eagle adult sitting on its nest with a chick peeking out over the nest edge, two adult gators (and two young gators), lots of birds, and wandered along a beach with no one but my friends as far as I could see in any direction.

The food was incredible and the cottages were really cool-- many were originals that had been updated with AC and electricity (but no tv, thankfully!).

Although we’ve reserved the entire island, I only have 11 rooms available. The cost per room is $1,950 which includes three nights on the island, all food, and all activities for two people.  

Activities include fishing (with all gear and bait), kayaking, guided tours of the island with naturalists, biking, exploring with motorized skiffs, beach wandering, bird and other wildlife watching, and hiking.

Rooms are double occupancy so if two people are in the room it's $325 per night each for three nights.

We are offering our 20 hour online course for CME plus 8 hours of live CME training.  CME fees are $799 (for a total of 28 hours of Category I CME).  

Please let me know ASAP if you are interested.  I’ve already sold three rooms and only have 8 more left.  

This is an incredible opportunity to visit one of my favorite places on earth.  By the way, kids are welcome and will love it-- when I toured the island last week I took my five year old and another dad with his 5 year old son.  Both the kids went crazy-- it was an awesome experience for all.

Build a Career in Tropical Medicine: An Interview with Professor David Warrell

In 2008, I had the opportunity to sit down with one of my medical heroes, Professor David Warrell of Oxford.  Professor Warrell has had an incredible career in Tropical Medicine, having published over 400 research papers and lived in multiple countries over the courser of the past 40 years.  I pulled this interview from the ExpedMed archives because it is simply so good.  

In this interview, I ask Professor Warrell about his career and ask how someone could build a career in Tropical Medicine today.  Below the video is a brief summary of Professor Warrell's bio.

Professor David Warrell is now Emeritus Professor of Tropical Medicine and Honorary Fellow of St. Cross College at the University of Oxford, UK. After training at Oxford, St Thomas’s Hospital and the Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London, UK, he has lived and worked as a physician, teacher, researcher and expedition doctor in Ethiopia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Kenya, Tanzania, Thailand, Burma, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Papua New Guinea, Brazil, Ecuador, Colombia and Peru. He is senior editor of the Oxford Textbook of Medicine and Essential Malariology and the Oxford Handbook of Expedition and Wilderness Medicine and has published more than 400 research papers and textbook chapters on malaria, rabies, relapsing fevers and other infectious and tropical diseases, comparative respiratory physiology, respiratory diseases, herpetology, venomous animals, envenoming and plant and chemical poisoning. He is a consultant to the World Health Organization (on malaria, rabies, snake bites, antivenom production), British Army, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Medical Research Council, Royal Geographical Society, Zoological Society of London and Earth Watch International. He is a past President of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene and International Federation for Tropical Medicine and Honorary Fellow of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Association of Physicians of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and Ceylon College of Physicians.

Physicians & Lifestyle Design

Over on Freelance MD, I've posted a couple of articles about taking responsibility for yourself and "building your own ship" , and we've also gone through a few common reasons why physicians aren't the best at career modification.

In this post, I'd like to spend a little time introducing you to the idea of "lifestyle design," something that has become a bit of a buzz-phrase in the business world but as far as I can tell hasn't penetrated the world of medicine just yet (for a lot of reasons).

I'll begin with a personal story...

When I jumped off the academic track in 2006, I wasn't exactly sure what I wanted to do as a career but I knew I wanted something unique.  My idea was to design a career that was flexible, fun, adventurous, and meaningful, all the while paying my bills and being a responsible spouse and parent.  Simple, huh?

I spent months thinking about how to do this as a physician.  I searched websites and blogs.  I spoke with mentors and colleagues.  I read the literature, all to no avail.  There seemed to be no conversation about a career like this in medicine.  I mean, there were a few articles about volunteer opportunities or non-traditional careers, but nothing really like what I was trying to create.  

What I found, though, was that while the medical community was silent about how to develop a very non-traditional and interesting career, the business world had already awakened to the idea.  Within the world of business, the idea of becoming a "free agent" and overhauling your career through "lifestyle design" was beginning to pick up steam. 

Around this time I picked up a copy of the book Free Agent Nation by Daniel Pink.  I'm not sure how I found this book, but it became a sort of manifesto for me.  In this book, Dan explains how more and more individuals were escaping their cubicles to become independent free-lancers and living their lives with increasing flexibility and empowerment.  It was a great read and it hit me at a very important time.  Through this book I realized that I was not alone in my desire for more autonomy, and that a lot of workers who had already yanked themselves off the grid were thriving.  I was hooked.

The second book I read was a book that has become a bit of a cult classic already, Timothy Ferriss' text, The 4-Hour Workweek .  This book is a basic introduction to how Tim built a stream of residual income and then used his extra time and money to explore his interests and live a more interesting life.  It was Tim's book that introduced me to the term "lifestyle design," and while the phrase might seem a bit hokey, it's a very powerful concept.  Basically, what Tim discusses in his book is the idea that it is possible to live an incredible life if you prioritize correctly, live frugally, and develop your entrepreneurial side.  Some have criticized the book recently, explaining that no productive person-- not even Tim Ferriss himself-- really only works four hours a week-- but I would argue that that's not really the point.  The catchy title sells books, but it's the mindset Tim describes that is the reason why the book is an important introduction for individuals who feel helplessly caught in a hamster wheel at work.  Tim's point is that you can-- through ingenuity and hard work-- leap off the hamster wheel and into something much better.

So how does all this apply to physicians?

Well, when you have a career discussion with most physicians, it often boils down to whether or not that individual wants to continue practicing clinical medicine or go into a nonclinical job.  There's nothing wrong with either, mind you, and I have friends who have great careers in each; however, for me and for many other physicians, I suspect, this approach is just too simplistic.

The fact is, I like clinical medicine.  I've spent a of of time getting good at what I do and I'd like to continue to be able to help people by providing good clinical care to patients who need it.  I also like many aspects of the nonclinical opportunities available to physicians-- things like consulting, writing, medical device development, and many other niches really appeal to me.

My main question is not whether I want to practice clinical medicine or jump into a nonclinical career, it's how do I design my life to be able to practice medicine, participate in the nonclinical activities I enjoy, and still have the flexibility to pursue life outside of medicine?  Discussions about clinical versus nonclinical are at their core too reductionistic for most modern physicians.  What most modern physicians really need to be having are overarching discussions about how to design a lifestyle that incorporates the multiple facets of their career interests and also does not overlook the ultimate (and most likely unspoken) goals they have for their lives. This is a much deeper conversation, but one that is desperately needed today in this time of significant upheaval in our healthcare system.

So where do you begin if you're a physician and you are interested in exploring this idea of "lifestyle design?"

Well, don't go to the career advice section of your specialty journal and certainly don't go to the HR person at your hospital or academic institution.  

In my opinion, you should begin by checking out the conversations going on in other fields.  There are some incredible websites built around some really creative and interesting people who are living fascinating lives and teaching others how to do the same.  Check out the following as a starting point:

Once you immerse yourself in this culture you begin to see possibilities that you never would have realized before.  What's more, as a physician there are even more possibilities available to you than for the typical person, if only you'll step out and take a little risk.

Over the last few years this idea of lifestyle design has been a focal point of my thinking when it comes to career moves and ultimate goals.  I've invested a lot of time, cash, and sweat into learning how to build a unique career, and my hope with ExpedMed is that we can use this website as a vehicle to help other physicians, just like you, succeed in designing a lifestyle and career they truly enjoy. 

This post was also posted on Medical Spa MD, a site for cosmetic physicians and Freelance MD a nonclinical site for physicians.

Wilderness Medicine Career: How to Get Into The Explorers Club

Dr. Michael VanRooyen and Starting a Company

Dr. Michael VanRooyen is the Director of the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative.  He's also the founder or co-founder of four start-up companies including Ibex, a patient tracking system for Emergency Departments that was eventually bought by Picis.

From 2002 to 2004, I worked as one of Mike's International Emergency Medicine fellows within the Johns Hopkins Department of Emergency Medicine.

This is a video clip of Mike's talk at our 2009 Medical Fusion Conference.  While Mike is most well-known for his humanitarian work, he's also a very astute businessman and entrepreneur.  If you're a Wilderness Medicine aficionado, you are probably familiar with Mike's work in international health, but in this video you get to see another side of him through his entrepreneurial experiences.

One of the purposes of this blog is to introduce you guys to the personalities behind the research and field work.  Mike is one of those dynamic individuals who is a leader in his field, and a great prototye for those interested in making Wilderness Medicine a career focus.